Why I believe in Pure Land

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  • Опубликовано: 13 июн 2014
  • Follow Alan Kwan as he discusses the fundamentals and his belief in the Pure Land tradition of Chinese Buddhism.
    Edited by Jean Cao
    Music: "Resignation" and "Easy Lemon" by Kevin MacLeod
    Buddhistdoor International 2014
    Be inspired by more Buddhist content at our main website, Buddhistdoor: www.buddhistdoor.net/

Комментарии • 12

  • Rock Python
    Rock Python Месяц назад

    Are the Bodhisattva's real celestial beings like the Sutras say or are they only characters in the Sutras for us to learn the Bodhisattva' path.

  • R. K. Vis
    R. K. Vis Месяц назад +2

    namo amituofo

  • John RKillick
    John RKillick 4 месяца назад +1

    Very good concise explanation :) The part about being in the 'same ocean' as ALL sentient beings is very important for me to hear right now, as I need to focus on compassion for all beings
    .Thank you Raymond and Alan :) Namo Amituofo!!!

  • Wal Souza
    Wal Souza Год назад +5

    Namo Amitabha Buddha from Brazil.

  • CC
    CC Год назад +1

    Interesting.

  • Steven Kok
    Steven Kok Год назад +5

    Amituofuo

  • M7CVZ
    M7CVZ 2 года назад +2

    Does Pure Land belong to 'Chinese' Buddhism? It's very big in Japan. It originated in India from "The Sutra of Visualization of the Buddha of Infinite Life". Neither Gautama or Amitabha is Chinese. So can we remove the word Chinese from the description? Or is there something I'm missing? Also, the sutra is fairly clear about the process here. Through the visualizations, your form the 'pure land' consciousness without your mind. Then at death, your mind is attracted to the domain that matches. 'Salvation' through mantra only, without visualization, is listed as being a lower rebirth into that pure land.

    • Beanie Bots
      Beanie Bots Год назад +1

      Jodo Shinshu or the "Pureland" sect of Buddhism was founded by Shinran Shonin in the 1200's in Japan. But he recognized 7 masters that were of great influence to the fundamentals of his teachings. 2 were from India, 3 were from China, and 2 from Japan. So I would agree that Pureland Buddhism belongs to all the world, and its origins were greatly influenced by many countries and cultures.

    • Buddhistdoor Global
      Buddhistdoor Global  Год назад +1

      Hello, thanks for your comment. The Pure Land tradition belongs to all the world, although the the specific tradition here as outlined by the guest has its roots in the Chinese expression of Pure Land and is distinct from Jodo Shu and other Japanese Pure Land schools. Similarly, Chan/Zen belong to all the world, including China and Japan, but the Chan and Zen schools have their distinct heritages.

  • weewilly2007
    weewilly2007 2 года назад +1

    sense of being undermined can lead to all sorts of qualities that are really methods to affirm the self. Like shoring up the psyche in the face of tidal onslaughts that erode ground, that humans physically as well as mentally operate on.

  • 大心釋
    大心釋 3 года назад +1

    阿弥陀佛!
    ruclip.com/video/a3FtBsY-7UE/видео.html

  • Sonny Lee
    Sonny Lee 3 года назад +5

    good. thx.